Yesterday, BBC director general Mark Thompson declared to the globe the station’s pursuit to produce “the best journalism in the world.” This is in response to an uproar from critics after BBC announced the 600 million-pound ($932.8 million) restructure that would see the elimination of the network’s sports programming and popular TV shows like Mad MenThe Office and The Wire.

Thompson went on to outline how BBC plans to heighten the quality of their journalistic coverage to replace the much-adored content: better special analysis, more in-depth examination of parliament, enhanced increased business, arts and culture and world coverage. It’s a tricky bait-and-switch; as the network shifts away from their online model, sports and television entertainment, it boosts its journalistic integrity, which is admirable.

But, at a time when the rest of the world’s newsrooms are decimated by layoffs from the outgoing recession, it feels like one of the wealthiest international news stations is rubbing salt in our wounds. In response to these sandbox antics, we at the Ryerson Review of Journalism accept Mr. Thompson’s challenge, and pledge to be the bestest journalists in the whole wide world.